Ann Morgan on Reading

Ann Morgan considered herself well read — until she discovered the "massive blindspot" on her bookshelf. Amid a multitude of English and American authors, there were very few books from beyond the English-speaking world. So she set an ambitious goal: to read one book from every country in the world over the course of a …

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The Decagon House Murders: Yukito Ayatsuji

The island of Tsunojima holds a dark secret. A year ago, the main house on the island burned down, killing four people—the architect, Nakamura Seiji and his wife, Kazue, and the couple working for them. Except that when the police examined the bodies, they found that the two couples had been murdered before the fire. …

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The Books in Our Lives

As those of you who continue to buy paper books know, there is a point you reach where you run out of space to store them. My husband and I are both holdouts against electronic books. But that comes at a price. Our bookshelves (all 12 of them!) are so packed that there isn’t the …

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Simon Schama on the London Library: Financial Times

Simon Schama writes eloquently about libraries, at a time when they seem to be under threat. When I was a child, I was left one afternoon a week at the British Council library. It was the highlight of my week, and the smell of a library still evokes hours of contented browsing and reading. And …

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